CASE STUDIES

As industry looks grim, N.C. weekly seeks audience development manager who will also be managing editor, gives readers local insights about Ukraine

This is the fifth in a series of Q&A insights as part of a “participatory case study” of the Chatham News + Record in Chatham County, North Carolina.

By Buck Ryan
Associate professor, School of Journalism and Media, University of Kentucky 

“When it’s grim, be the Grim Reaper and go get it.”

With 13 seconds left in an AFC Divisional Round playoff game, that was the advice Kansas City Chiefs coach Andy Reid gave his quarterback, Patrick Mahomes. The results turned into an NFL classic: success for the Chiefs and heartbreak for the Buffalo Bills.

For Chiefs fan Bill Horner III, publisher and editor of the Chatham (N.C.) News + Record, things look grim for community newspapers almost everywhere. Rather than buckle, he has decided to go get it.

Since November 2018 when Horner and two partners bought two failing newspapers, The News and The Record, and merged them, Horner has slowly developed a successful formula by trial and error to increase revenues, navigate staff turnover, counter lingering pandemic effects on the bottom line—and manage stress that can be so debilitating.

One unique aspect of this formula is taking a global outlook to coverage. Where else are you going to find a community newspaper offering insights on Russia, Ukraine, China, Afghanistan, Mexico and Latin America?

In his latest show of confidence to make the world his oyster, Horner has posted a new full-time job, audience development manager, a newly createdposition to serve as both a managing editor to help him balance his newsroom workload and an extra pair of hands to advance initiatives to increase subscriptions, both print and digital, and other revenues.

Over the last three years and four months, Horner’s newspaper has made its mark for quality, winning both print and online honors from the North Carolina Press Association, while he struggled to close a $2,000-a-week gap between expenses and revenue.

On some good weeks, he has whittled that deficit down to zero. The newspaper turned a small profit in January. Now he hopes the new position will help him turn the corner to a sustainable profitability as he gains the time to implement money-making ideas and audience-funneling ideas from his training sessions with the Knight-Lenfest Table Stakes program and the Membership Accelerator of the Facebook Journalism Project. 

Horner took a break to answer some questions in the hopes his experiences might help and inspire other community newspaper publishers.

Bill Horner III and wife, Lee Ann, during their cruise
Question 1: I know we have a lot of important issues to discuss, but I just can’t get over this first question: How on earth did you put out a week’s edition while on a cruise in the Caribbean?

Answer: Well, it's not like I did it by myself! But we're a small staff and there are certain things that only I do. Since we work off servers, anywhere there's internet, I can work. The good part of that is I can communicate with the newsroom and our designers, proof copy, proof pages and approve pages from anywhere.

I've done it from a coffee shop while on mission trips to Odessa, Ukraine; while on vacation in the mountains of North Carolina and Colorado; and while visiting the Florida coast and the Kansas prairie—and even from a few different ships.

The bad part of that is that I really can't take a "real" vacation on those production days. For me, that’s Sunday through Tuesday. But if you are used to having a working vacation, putting out a newspaper from a secluded deck on a cruise ship isn't a bad place to do it. I even got myself a piƱa colada (virgin, of course) while processing copy that Monday.

In Stephen Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, there’s Habit No. 7: "Sharpen the saw," which means having a balanced program for self-renewal. Managing stress is an essential talent for a community newspaper publisher.

While I’m not on vacation, I still keep Covey's "Sharpen the saw" in mind. I find ways to do that during the week, making Wednesday my "recovery day." It doesn't always work out — it's a Wednesday now as I write this, it's 6:30 in the evening and I'm still working, going since about 7 this morning.

But I'm on my screened-in porch, with the fireplace going, and I took the dog on two long walks today. So it's not horrible. And I try to make time to read every day, something for self-development or whatever other book I'm into. That helps, too.

Question 2: Congratulations on getting to the point of posting the new job of audience development manager. How did that come about?

My partners are well aware of the workload I carry. Each of them carries a heavy load in their other businesses. And they know it’s been hard for me to find the time to implement all of the ideas from the Knight-Lenfest Table Stakes and Facebook Accelerator programs, particularly since half my week is devoted to production.

We have formal catch-up meetings monthly, and recently one of them asked: “What would it take to get you some help?” They know I didn’t replace a managing editor position that came open almost two years ago, so that’s where the discussion went.

We have plans to raise revenues from a membership program, to introduce a series of new newsletters to attract more readers and subscribers, to create “What’s Next, Chatham?” public forums to improve community problem-solving—more good ideas than time to implement them. If we hire the right new person, that can be a game changer for us. The longer we wait, the more likely our windows of opportunity will close.

Here’s a little story to help you see what we’re up against: I was at a Monday night school board meeting and the local blogger—every town has one—came up to our photographer and me. He has a couple of online sites, a couple of Facebook pages and an email “newsletter” (it’s really more like a bulletin board), but he only covers about a third of the county. Still, he considers himself a real news organization, although 96 percent of what he puts out and shares comes from other online sources. Only about 4 percent, if that, is original.

He was passing out little notecards promoting his sites. When he got to me, he said, “Oh, you’re the competition.” The hard part is that to some people in our market, we’re no different than him. But what we do, in the eyes of anyone who knows what journalism is, is day-and-night different.

Question No. 3: I’m impressed with the international coverage in your newspaper, something that makes your weekly unique. I also know the Ukraine issue is personal for you. How did you decide to bring that crisis home to your readers?

We throw around the term “hyper-local” a lot in our industry. But I like to think about news and reporting in terms of relevance and whether an article is worth a reader’s time to be engaged with a topic. Obviously Ukraine is a long way from Chatham County, but the Russia story is really relevant to all of us, whether we realize it or not. And it’s news, and we’re a newspaper, so we’re going to find the local angle. 

We have a former ambassador and diplomat in our market, Bob Pearson, who retired with his wife, Maggie, to Chatham County. Maggie is also a retired diplomat. They’re very active in Chatham and still so in tune with what’s happening in Europe. They shared a byline on a story they wrote for us in September after the Afghanistan withdrawal last year.

I also have a good friend, Maia Mikhaluk, who with her husband is on the front lines in Ukraine. Their hometown is in the capital city of Kyiv. I’ve been to Ukraine four times on mission trips. I know these incredible people who have such a history of suffering. The connection is International Partnerships, a ministry with a team of full-time faith leaders based in Boone, N.C., about 140 miles west of our Siler City newspaper office.

So as I read more and more about Putin’s moves toward invasion, I thought: Let’s leverage those connections to share insights with the people of Chatham County about why we should care about what’s happening in Ukraine. I reached out to both Maia and Bob, and they happily did the work. Bob’s commentary was strong, and Maia, an incredible photographer, really added something to her package with her pictures.

Then you, Buck, picked up on a quote from Maia’s article—“Like most Ukrainians, I am preparing emergency backpacks and marking on our Google maps the bomb shelters closest to my home and office”—and leveraged your contacts in Russia to write an exceptional piece from the perspective of Russian journalists covering the story.

After the invasion, Maia wrote a follow-up article about carrying on with life amid the bombings, and I now routinely share her Facebook posts.

I think we would have been remiss not to publish those articles, given the fact that all the writers were so ready and willing to share what they know and what they’ve seen. I don’t know how much traction those stories got, but I firmly believe we had the responsibility to put those articles out there. They’re important and give our readers a unique perspective on a story dominating the news, from White House speeches to our own backyard.

Question 4: You have opened a whole new world in Chatham County with your publication of a Spanish-language newspaper, La Voz de Chatham (Voice of Chatham). What’s the latest progress report on revenue and readers for that project? 

We published three print editions of La Voz de Chatham last year—in April, September and December. The first edition was a broadsheet like our weekly newspaper, then the other two editions were published in a tabloid format, which we found easier to design and mail.

The three publications were supported by a total of $24,000 in sponsorships, plus about $7,000 in ad revenue the last two editions. We are planning a fourth print edition for spring, though La Voz articles appear regularly on our website in English with Spanish translations.

The La Voz de Chatham story started in 2020 with a $30,300 Facebook grant to cover an underserved segment of our community particularly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

The grant allowed us to add reporters. Victoria Johnson was a real find. She originally covered stories in our Spanish-speaking community, connecting families and issues from Mexico and Latin America to Chatham County.

Johnson then became the lead writer for La Voz when we folded those kinds of articles into a print Spanish-language publication.

We debuted La Voz de Chatham in April 2021 as an 18-page broadsheet that we mailed to 2,500 Spanish-speaking households in Chatham County. That was made possible in part by a $8,000 sponsorship grant from Chatham Hospital.

We redesigned the publication to make it a tabloid for our second edition, which we published in September. Mountaire Farms, a food processing company specializing in chicken products, was so pleased with our outreach to the underserved community that it gave us $18,000—promised in the spring and paid off in December. The company has several Spanish-speaking employees.

We just had a planning session for our spring edition. Demand for it is high. We’ve doubled our distribution (2,500 to 5,000) and interest in the publication continues to grow. It’s not a money-maker for us yet, but it’s helped us reach new audiences and it’s a momentum-builder.

Question 5: We gave a lecture to a 9 o’clock morning journalism class at Jilin University in China, thanks to Zoom, a 13-hour time difference and an invitation from a former Duke University visiting scholar. What did you learn from that experience?

The reality on the ground in China is that community journalism is dealing with some of the very same challenges we face here: credibility, staffing and profitability. The invitation to speak to the journalism class came from its instructor, Associate Professor Siqi Zhang. I met her when she visited our newspaper office in 2020 while she was a visiting scholar at Duke down the road.

Siqi has published articles in our newspaper; for example, about a Covid-19 art contest and a PPE donation to nursing homes.

We delivered our joint presentation, entitled “The Rise and Fall—and Rise—of Community Newspapers in the U.S.,” at 8 p.m. on Nov. 17, 2021, and—voila—we were speaking live on Zoom to Siqi’s class at 9 a.m. on Nov. 18. It was so much fun.

I’m glad that you were able to write an article about the experience for our newspaper with Siqi’s star student, Duo Yuanyuan. I think the main takeaway for me was journalists just about everywhere—including China—have the same drive to tell stories, provide compelling reporting and find ways to reach readers with the truth. And: hope for the young!

Publisher junks general-interest-newspaper assumptions; aims for audiences, plural; and new sources of revenue

By Buck Ryan
Associate Professor, University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media

This is the fourth in a series of articles from “a participatory case study” of the Chatham (N.C.) News + Record.

Simon & Garfunkel’s lament—“nothing but the dead and dying”—may be the haunting anthem for a struggling newspaper industry, but not for Bill Horner III’s town of Siler City (population 8,078) in rural Chatham County, North Carolina.

There the publisher and editor of a feisty community newspaper, the Chatham News + Record, is working to defy the odds, providing a light out of the wilderness for other family-owned or independent journalism enterprises.

Just as Chatham County sees gains in population and median household income, Horner reports increases for average weekly circulation revenue, digital subscriptions and weekly newsletter open rates, though print sales and advertising revenue have remained frustratingly flat.

The paper has partnered with a local coffee roaster.

The paper’s e-newsletter, The Chatham Brew, promotes a special blend of coffee for sale by the same name as part of the paper’s innovative collaboration with a local coffee roaster.

Drink coffee while you read the newspaper? Now you can buy the same brand. Read all about it in the newsletter, which is sent on email three times a week to 3,800 recipients.

Taking the bold move of publishing a spinoff of the newspaper all in Spanish, La Voz de Chatham (The Voice of Chatham), Horner saw his gamble pay off handsomely with seven full-page ads in the 18-page publication.

Mailed directly to 2,500 Spanish-speaking households in the market, the publication gained more than moral support among its new readers. The spinoff project is expected to generate a total of $32,000 in new sponsorship revenue with $24,000 in hand and an additional $8,000 in the works.

The new revenues came mostly is a $16,000 sponsorship from a local chicken processing plant, Mountaire Farms, which employs many Spanish-speaking workers in the community.

Chatham Hospital contributed an $8,000 sponsorship and is entertaining a request for an additional $8,000 to keep the new publication rolling.

Follow-up print editions of La Voz are planned for August, December and April as interest increases.

Learning to unlearn  

Horner is doing a lot of things right. He has received national recognition through a featured webinar for America’s Newspapers and acceptance as one of only 30 publications nationally into a Facebook Membership Accelerator grant program, and an article on the Medill Local News Initiative site.

But they are not always the things he learned from his grandfather, who founded the Sanford Herald, 20 miles south and now chain-owned, in 1930. In fact, Horner has developed a new skill for a new age: learning to unlearn habits of general-interest newspapering.

Coaching on alternate ways of thinking from the Facebook training program and Table Stakes, a Knight Foundation and Lenfest Institute initiative, brought Horner to the brink of despair.

So did the realization that the strategy “build it and they will come” has largely fizzled for him and his two business partners in the last two and a half years since they purchased two money-losing weekly newspapers, the Chatham News and the Chatham Record.

Horner’s goal in Table Stakes is to fill a $100,000 annual revenue gap in loss of advertising that he attributes to multiple factors: the pandemic, a come-and-go ad sales staff, and national trends.

Shifting from subscriptions to memberships with varying benefits levels, launching a parenting newsletter, and gaining sponsorships for a video newscast are among the future revenue-generating ideas.

It’s a gamble, for sure, and one as great as trying pull Chatham County officials and citizens together for the public good.

Google map, adapted
When Horner explores the various potential audiences for his newspaper, he sees a county split more ways than a roulette wheel with several divisions: political (Trump flags in the west and BLM signs in the east), socioeconomic (very rich and very poor) and racial (12.7% black, 12.5% Hispanic).

These are the times that try a community newspaper publisher’s soul. To share some common sense, Horner agreed to take a break for an interview.

He hopes his hard-fought epiphanies can benefit his journalism colleagues nationally. Here goes the Q&A:

You got hit from both sides—Table Stakes and Facebook—with the coaching advice that “the general-interest newspaper is dead.” That stung pretty hard. How did you get back on your feet?

With lots of conversations on this topic with friends and colleagues in the industry who are succeeding. The feedback I got was everything from, “That’s ridiculous—just ignore that!” to “Well, as much as I hate to admit it, there’s a lot of truth to that.” Ultimately most all of us agreed that you have to produce a product that has specific appeal to your potential audiences because there’s so much competition for attention, especially in the digital sphere.

Table Stakes emphasizes the “s” at the end of “audiences” and talks about “growing the audience funnel.” That means moving readers from wide but shallow interest down the funnel to loyal, paying customers.

To create more customers like that demands a strategic approach, not the traditional general-interest, scattershot product. Getting from “A” to “B” requires deep thinking about your audiences. The noise of the digital landscape is so loud that if you don’t, you’ll get pushed aside.

We all have to think really, really hard about what we’re doing, what we’re publishing for. If we’re not out there trying to solve a specific problem for our readers, then why are we working so hard?

You’re now most of the way through the year-long Table Stakes program, facing a final presentation in September on meeting your goals. What would you say are your top three lessons learned at this point?

It’s hard to narrow it down to just three, but I’d say:

A. You have to be audience-driven. The days of our front pages setting the news agenda, and assuming the audience would take cues from us, are long gone.

B. You need to go to where your audiences are. You can’t expect them to come to you. Meet them where they are. That’s the only way connection and engagement are created. I think our Spanish-language newspaper is the best example of that.

C. You need to explore diversifying ways to grow revenue. That’s more obvious than ever. There aren’t silver bullets, but there are ways you can test and innovate to create a value proposition to your readers and advertisers.

I think our collaboration with a local coffee roaster to create The Chatham Brew blend is a good example. We spent $600 to buy at a wholesale price bags of coffee we’re offering as gifts to entice new subscribers. That way we can support a local business, add value to our new readers and bring a smile to our e-newsletter readers who see the promotion.

Your Facebook Membership Accelerator grant lived up to the warning: “Beware of gifts that eat.” You devoted one full workday a week with staff to Zoom coaching sessions in a 12-week program. Now that the sessions are complete, how did it go, what have you learned and how will you spend the grant money?

Since the program began, our weekly digital subscriber revenue grew to $1,600 a week from $1,100, so that was a real “win” for us.

Each of the news organizations in my cohort of 30 publications is getting $50,000. We had to create a budget on how we would spend the money, and most of it will go to vendors to help us work more profitably.

The new vendors will include BlueLena, designed to convert anonymous website visitors to registered customers and support audience growth, engagement and monetization; Second Street, which will help us manage contests and collect and manage email databases; The Newspaper Manager, software to improve ad sales; and Pico and Stripe (through BlueLena), which will help us accept and send payments more efficiently.

For the Facebook training, we were split into two groups — larger and smaller news organizations—and we were in the smaller organization group.

There weren’t many legacy print organizations like ours in the program, which surprised me at first. Most were online-only, but all were doing good journalism and were focused and driven.

The Accelerator program has really reinforced what we’ve talked about in Table Stakes about the audience funnel, but it’s much more focused on things like being agile, moving audiences into the funnel and creating a great UX (user experience). So much good stuff through this program. But one thing that stands out is taking a critical look inward, at everything we do, and tossing aside old assumptions.

One of the things we said in our final presentation is that just because you build it, that doesn’t mean they’ll come to you. And “they” isn’t one single unified “audience.” We now have the tools at our disposal to determine how to reach and connect to and engage with our existing audiences and potential audiences to drive loyalty.

We already do great journalism and outreach. Our e-newsletter, for example, was named the best for North Carolina community newspapers the last two years. That in itself is not enough. We have to do “the other things” to deliver quality to our market in a way that creates strategic engagement, which leads to sustainability.

The “backlog” we’ve created in Accelerator — the list of things we want to do, to do differently, to test, to experiment with — is pretty long. It involves looking hard at social media platforms, testing a video news program, adding a new podcast and so much more. We don’t know what’s going to work best — that’s why we test — but we know that if we keep doing what we’ve been doing, sustainability will be out of reach.

You’ve seen average weekly circulation revenue grow and e-newsletter open rates skyrocket. To what do you owe this success?

Well, I think we have a stellar product, first of all. But I think the bulk of that growth is because we’ve focused on it and are measuring it. As the old management expression goes, “What gets measured gets done.” You can’t manage what you don’t measure.

We’re asking people to read us, to subscribe, to check out our newsletters. We are no longer just casting fishing lines and hoping for the best. We’re now more purposeful, making direct asks.

Also we’re paying more attention to how to measure our impact. We now can say our weekly e-newsletter reaches 3,800 readers, up from 2,100, because we updated our email list by adding registered website users. Our goals are to increase print newspaper sales by 25 percent, to 2,002 from 1,601, and digital subscribers by the same percentage of increase to 3,351 from 2,681. But we’re not there yet. Most of our print circulation is street sales from convenience store purchases.

One of the most common questions from participants in an America’s Newspapers webinar dealt with the differences between subscriptions and memberships, particularly the benefits from a membership. How did you explain that to other owners of family-owned or independent newspapers?

A subscription to the News + Record, whether it be print or digital, has a set cost. For us, it’s $52/year for print plus digital. We have so many people in our market who have the capacity and desire to support us financially with more than just a subscription. Creating a membership program, with benefits, allows us to tap into their desire to support good journalism in various other ways and with a higher level of financial support.

We are planning to roll out a membership program at different prices for individuals as well as companies and organizations as a result of our Table Stakes coaching.

We can provide added value, for example, through events that share expertise and provide networking opportunities. We saw success with holding events before the pandemic, and now that Chatham County is opening up more and more, we will be able to get back on track with that strategy.

Success recipe? Weekly wins awards after filling revenue gap with grants, sponsorships, and relief money, and collaborating with journalism schools

This is the third in a series of articles from a case study of the Chatham (N.C.) News + Record.

By Buck Ryan
Associate professor, University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media

This is the story of a $120,300 juggling act involving human capital, dollars and sense.

As the Chatham News + Record enters its third year of new ownership, the publisher and editor and his staff are celebrating a record number of awards from the North Carolina Press Association.

The paper won 28 news awards in the annual contest for 2020, or more than any other newspaper in its division as a small weekly (3,800 paid circulation, about half from street sales).

That number of awards was also more than any other newspaper in the state received except for three metro dailies. The awards, announced on Feb. 26, included prizes in the two major General Excellence categories: Website (first place) and Overall (runner-up).

But alas, the awards carry no fiscal benefits. The cruel reality for community newspapers is that quality is necessary but not sufficient for profitability. Every day is a street fight for sustainability.

In November 2018, along with two business partners involved in commercial and residential real estate, Publisher and Editor Bill Horner III purchased and combined two money-losing newspapers, the News and the Record. He then oversaw their redesign to create the print and website presence of the Chatham News + Record.

From the start, Horner was consumed by the juggling act facing every community newspaper leader: revenue and staffing. He remains the only original staff member on the news side and the head worrier about plugging holes in a sinking advertising-revenue ship, bleeding up to $2,000 a week.

This is a glimpse at how Horner has kept his award-winning journalistic vessel afloat, raising more than $37,300 from grants, adding $18,000 from sponsorships and securing $60,000 from the Covid-19 relief Payroll Protection Plan, plus $5,000 in underwriting from the Missouri School of Journalism to support an innovation intern.

It’s a vessel propelled by just four full-time reporters, yet over the last 27 months, Horner has said goodbye to multiple staff members in news, advertising or business office positions.

More than 100 years of local reporting experience churned in 2020 through the loss of two reporters, a managing editor, one sports editor and a part-time sportswriter. That revolving door, greased by layoffs, attrition and necessary changes, also included three interns, two freelance photographers and Horner’s own son.

Zachary Horner, the paper’s star reporter, won five press-association awards in his year at the paper before his father encouraged him to take a much higher-paying communications job, with benefits, at the county health department.

On and off, until he found the right advertising director, Horner handled ad sales himself while managing to report, write, edit and oversee off-site production and press runs.

How did he do it all? Here’s the Q&A that I conducted with Horner:

What has been your greatest success in finding sponsorships, and how did you do it?
    We have a wonderful sponsorship from our local Council on Aging, which used $10,000 from a grant it received to purchase more than 200 subscriptions for seniors who didn’t already subscribe to the News + Record.
    Chatham County has one of the oldest populations in North Carolina, and we covered several stories about the tremendous work the council does serving that group.
    The council’s executive director loved the changes we made to the News + Record, and he would occasionally ask how things were going. I told him we weren’t growing our audience as quickly as we’d hoped. Some time later he called me to say he was applying for a grant and he hoped to use part of it, or $5,000, to fund subscription purchases for council members.
    They got such great response from these new readers that when those 200-plus six-month subscriptions ended, the council wrote us another check for $5,000 from the grant funds for renewals.
    
President Reagan famously said, “The nine most terrifying words in the English language are: I’m from the government and I’m here to help.” Yet you benefited from the Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP. What was involved?
    We applied through a local bank. The application process was fairly easy because of our existing relationship with the bank. We got a little over $60,000, but we just missed meeting the qualifications for the second round because we didn’t meet the 25 percent drop-in-revenue threshold — barely.
    Of course, the best part is that it’s a forgivable loan. There’s a 5 p.m. ET March 9, 2021, deadline for funding for businesses with fewer than 20 employees and sole proprietors. Here’s the link.
    Another option for us was the Covid Economic Injury Disaster Loan, which, unfortunately, isn’t forgivable. Here’s a link if another community newspaper was interested in applying.

Facebook and Google are commonly viewed as threats, yet you have secured $37,300 in grants from them. What impact did those grants have?
    The $30,300 Facebook Journalism Project grant was a game-changer for us, and we used a $7,000 Google Ad grant to augment our expanded coverage. Originally our coverage focused on Covid’s effects on the Latinx community as part of La Voz de Chatham, or the Voice of Chatham.
    But soon the range of stories expanded so far beyond Covid that we just closed out the ad deadline for our first Spanish-language print edition. We sold seven full pages of ads, so this first edition will have at least 14 pages.
    We’re going to direct-mail it to more than 2,100 Spanish-speaking households in our market. This first edition was made possible by an $8,000 Chatham Hospital sponsorship, which we’re hoping to renew in July.
    We are in the process of applying for one of Facebook’s Accelerator Program grants. Here’s the link, and note the March 19, 2021, deadline.
    If a Google grant makes sense for another newspaper owner, here’s a link to find details about how to apply.

How has your relationships with journalism schools, including the University of Missouri, paid off?
    Thanks to you, Buck, a proud Mizzou grad, I was introduced to Kat Duncan, now director of innovation at the Reynolds Journalism Institute. We then made a pitch to have the News + Record designated as one of the sites for an RJI Student Innovation Fellowship.
    We were delighted to hear from Kat that a recent graduate, Caroline Watkins, would be our summer 2020 intern to help us create an innovative social media presence. Just as exciting was the news that Mizzou would pay her salary, a $5,000 stipend, and expected that she work for 30 to 40 hours a week for 12 weeks.
    Kat likes to share the wealth of funding and talent, so if this sounds good to another newspaper editor, go for it! I can’t tell you enough how valuable Caroline was for us on improving reader engagement. She now works as an audience growth producer at The State newspaper in Columbia, S.C.
    Here are some more details about the Mizzou program.
    We have our eye on another Mizzou source of funding, as we are always pushing innovation. The Reynolds Journalism Institute is accepting 2021-22 RJI Fellowship applications from individuals or organizations with an innovative journalism project idea that could also benefit the industry.
    We’ve also been tremendously blessed by our relationship with the Hussman School of Journalism and Media at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. We hired three reporters from there in the last year and one this year, either as interns while they were still in school or as recent grads.
    We also collaborated with UNC on “Our Chatham/One Chatham,” which produced a series of “community conversations” on poverty’s effect on education, socioeconomic inequality in Chatham County and teen mental health.
    The adviser to the student newspaper, The Daily Tar Heel, and I consult on business matters. They are helping us redesign our advertising rate card.

Sometimes you have to pay a little to get a chance to reap a lot. How much did Table Stakes cost you and what’s your hope that the investment will pay off?
    That’s another UNC collaboration, particularly with the Center for Innovation and Sustainability.
    We paid $1,500 to join Table Stakes, a Knight Foundation-supported initiative designed to help me close a $100,000 annual revenue gap, also known as my Performance Challenge. Here’s some background.
    I have been assigned a coach and we meet weekly in addition to our regular full cohort meetings. We set short-term goals around one big idea—transition from subscriptions to a membership program—and other initiatives, including a parenting newsletter.
    The program has brought me together with a team of consultants and an amazing cohort of journalists from a wide variety of news media organizations—print, broadcast and online—in North Carolina as well as Tennessee, Florida, South Carolina and Virginia. I heartily recommend Table Stakes to other newspaper editors and publishers.

N.C. weekly uses Facebook grant to create new base of Latinx readers

This is the second in a series of articles from a case study of the Chatham (N.C.) News + Record.
By Buck Ryan
Associate professor, University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media

Over the last nine months, the Chatham News + Record has leveraged a $30,300 Facebook grant to receive an $8,000 commitment from a local hospital by giving voice to a voiceless Latinx community on a health issue, namely the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As weekly community newspapers, suffering financially from the pandemic’s jolt to advertising revenues, struggle to stay afloat, the News + Record (3,800 paid circulation, about half from street sales) provides some valuable lessons on how to improve quality news coverage that gets recognized with financial support from a community institution.

The newspaper with two offices in Chatham County towns, Pittsboro and Siler City, sits between Duke University and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. UNC’s Hussman School of Journalism and Media provides student reporting talent. The Facebook project added faculty guidance by Paul Cuadros, an associate journalism professor at UNC, who has the advantage of living in Chatham County.

Back in May, the newspaper reported, “The News + Record was named one of just 144 local U.S. news organizations — and one of just nine in all of North Carolina — as a recipient of a Facebook Journalism Project COVID-19 Local News Relief Grant.”

Editor and Publisher Bill Horner III, along with a full-time reporter hired on the Facebook grant, tell the success story in hopes of inspiring other community newspaper editors and publishers searching for ways to solve the profession’s revenue puzzle and to garner another valuable asset: trust.

Here’s the Q&A I conducted with Horner:

1. What inspired you to apply for a Facebook grant?

The need for an influx of revenue! That aside, it quickly shifted for me as an opportunity to do exactly what the goal of the grant was: for a newspaper to cover and to serve an underserved community. The largest employer in our market is a poultry processing facility and its largest employee base is Latinx. So with COVID ravaging our community, it presented an opportunity to tell stories about a marginalized part of our potential readership base.

A strong Latinx community (12.5 percent) lives in the western half the county with a significant undocumented population, and a largely white (71.6 percent), eclectic mix of residents live in the other half. At one elementary school in the southwest, 98 percent of students receive free or reduced lunches — while in the northeast, close to Chapel Hill, some of the most affluent residents in the state have homes.

COVID’s impact on the Latinx community is a story that many of our readers either didn’t know about or, frankly, didn’t care. Who else could tell those stories but us?

2. What was the application process like?

It was a very simple process. The application clearly spelled out what Facebook was looking for in terms of how it would prioritize applicants. Developing the idea was instantaneous; the hardest part was the wordsmithing.

Facebook is asking newspapers to stay tuned for future funding possibilities with this link. and here’s background on the Facebook grant that the News + Record received.

3. How did you use the money?

We funded a full-time reporter, Victoria Johnson, a 2020 UNC journalism graduate fluent in Spanish, and a part-time reporter, Patsy Montesinos, a UNC journalism senior and native speaker with family from Mexico. We allocated some of the funds to underwrite extra pages in our weekly print edition to include the stories we were adding to our coverage lineup. The funding also covered the cost of photography as well as news story translations done by Johnson and checked by Montesinos. We post all those stories in front of our paywall on our website in English and in Spanish.


4. What was your greatest accomplishment?

Engaging and compelling storytelling that serves a population otherwise mostly not listened to by many of our traditional readers. We are also building trust within that community, which is very difficult to do. Here’s how Victoria Johnson answered the question: 

“I think our greatest accomplishment lies in our name — La Voz de Chatham, or the Voice of Chatham. We’ve amplified the voices of those who usually don’t appear in mainstream American newspapers — either because they don’t speak English or because they fear speaking to the press. I think it’s safe to say that we’ve gained the trust of many among Chatham County’s Hispanic community, undocumented immigrants or citizens, young or old, Spanish speaking or bilingual.”

As for her focus, Johnson said, “We are reporting on COVID-19's impact on the Hispanic community in Chatham County — everything from businesses, social life and religious life to the inequities that the pandemic has only served to worsen. We want to publish important information in Spanish related to the pandemic and the governor's response. We also want to celebrate Chatham's Hispanic community with community member spotlights.”

5. In what other ways did the Facebook grant benefit the newspaper and the community?

Many, many ways, but I think foremost was to demonstrate to our community how serious we are about good reporting and community service. Thanks to Victoria, we covered the struggles many Spanish-speaking families have faced during remote learning, the difficulties confronting Hispanic churches to maintain and support their congregations throughout COVID-19 as well as the struggles — and triumphs — of Latinx high school students. We focused on success stories, like the profile of Octavio Hernandez, who crossed the border at 12 years old and who later built a successful steel erection company in Siler City. We took a multimedia approach to storytelling. Montesinos created a short documentary about one Siler City family who had sacrificed nearly everything to put all three of their children in college. We measure results through reader reactions, such as the Pittsboro pastor who reached out to help the Hispanic churches and Ilana Dubester, executive director of the Hispanic Liaison nonprofit in Siler City, who begins nearly every interview thanking us for consistently covering their community.

More details about the coverage are available on the newspaper’s website and on Facebook.

6. What’s next?

We hope that the $8,000 commitment from our new sponsor, Chatham Hospital, as well as the recognition we have received for our coverage of the Latinx community, will position us to apply for more funding from Facebook and a second, $16,000 sponsorship from the hospital in July as its next fiscal year begins.

How a North Carolina weekly has covered the Confederate monuments issue

This is the first in a series of articles from a case study of the Chatham (N.C.) News + Record.

By Buck Ryan
Associate professor, University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media

The Chatham News + Record has been embroiled in coverage of issues surrounding a Confederate statue in front of the Chatham County Historic Courthouse, now a museum in Pittsboro, N.C.

Editor and Publisher Bill Horner III addressed the controversy in an editorial, “A message to the agitators: When enough is simply enough.” Inspired by the editorial, I conducted a Q&A with Horner:

What was the tipping point that led to your editorial?

The protests have attracted activists and extremists from outside Chatham County. A few neo-Confederate groups and a few extreme liberal groups have camped here on weekends and raised the level of rancor and added much hate to the mix. They needed to be called out on it. Our photographer would take pictures of groups of protesters and longtime residents would say, “I don’t recognize one person in that picture.”

It’s clearly gotten to the point where enough is enough. The statue issue is going to come down to a legal ruling; it’s not a popularity contest and it won’t be settled with a public vote. These Saturday protesters from outside Chatham County aren’t adding to the conversation. They’re bringing more anger and more hate into an already volatile situation, which accomplishes not one thing. That’s what drove me to write this latest editorial.

When did the Confederate statue issue first emerge?

The “Our Confederate Heroes” statue was erected in 1907, and I’ve heard anecdotally that it has been a point of contention for some of the county’s African-American population over the years. Pittsboro’s mayor recounted a conversation she had with a black resident recently who said many of those in the African-American community always thought the soldier in the “Our Confederate Heroes” monument was black.

For the most part, the issue of moving the statue didn’t get real steam until a local group called Chatham For All began this past spring to push the county commissioners to move it. The local group was led primarily by “new” Chatham residents who either retired here or transplanted here over the last few years from outside North Carolina. That’s what has angered so many of the locals, most of whom, it seems from my observation, have seen it simply as a memorial to those from the county who fought and sacrificed during the Civil War. So many people look at this as a case of outside agitators stirring up trouble where trouble didn’t exist before, but clearly the issue is more complicated and complex than that.

What has been your approach to the coverage?

Measured and balanced and not overblown. That’s been the goal.

So you have to look at our coverage of the discussions at public meetings and in the community about the future of the statue and the commissioners’ work to address it as one piece of our work, and the protests that have followed as another. Our focus has been on the former; we’ve tried hard not to do what some of the state’s TV stations have done in terms of sensationalizing the protests. All sorts of media come on Saturdays to show the protesters clash. It’s like a made-for-TV show. We’re watching, but telling the more relevant stories.

We recognize that some of the protesters are doing things for effect. Remember, the protests began after the county commissioners ruled that the statue’s owners, the United Daughters of the Confederacy’s local chapter, had to move it. So a lot of what’s happened since is bloviating and yelling and making noise. In those instances, we have to ask: Is this newsworthy? How newsworthy, in the scheme of things? Protesters are lining up on opposite sides now almost every Saturday in Pittsboro, our county seat, so we’re looking at issues such as, How are downtown businesses impacted? As opposed to, say, what are the arguments of the agitators who come in from out of state and scream and spit at those on the other side?

Playwright Arthur Miller once said, “A good newspaper, I suppose, is a nation talking with itself.” What have you done, beyond coverage, to promote a community conversation about the issue?

We’ve tried really hard to have broad and balanced coverage and explain the issues succinctly and clearly. Editorially, we chastised the UDC when they walked away from the negotiations with the county on the future of the statue; that was Chatham County’s one great opportunity to show everyone that we could do it right, and do it better, and solve a problem without pouting or pointing fingers. We’ve also welcomed guest columns and published letters to the editor about the statue.

But we’ve also worked at the same time to point out there are many more serious, many more significant issues that need addressing in Chatham County. Our “One Chatham” public forums, for example, have taken place during all this hullabaloo with the statue. We could have packed the house with a public forum about the statue, but instead one addressed socioeconomic inequality among our residents and another addressed poverty’s impact on public education. We also have had a series of stories about mental health issues in the Hispanic community and one man’s effort to lead a conversation about the county’s lynching legacy. We can’t guide conversation on the statue because there’s so little of it; as I said earlier, it’s a lot of yelling and not much listening. But we can tell the relevant stories in a measured way.

What have been the reactions from readers?

A few weeks ago, I received two email messages taking us to task. One woman railed about how it’s so obvious we’re in favor of having the statue removed. Another said we were horrible journalists because it was so clear we’re in favor of letting the statue remain. Both messages were referring to the same exact news story.

We got a very angry call from one elected official berating us for — and this is what he said — publishing stories that were “too balanced, too fair.” He thought our stories should have been slanted toward the statue’s removal.

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